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Pressing On

In the 1920s, Lions clubs continued to expand and serve communities with such projects as fundraising for a children's hospital.

In the 1920s, Lions clubs continued to expand and serve communities with such projects as fundraising for a children's hospital.

Pressing On

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Touchstone Story #28

Lions Clubs International thrived in the 1920s as organizations that focused on serving others captured the imagination of the American public. As the United States entered the Roaring Twenties, a new ideal of service and voluntarism generated a wave of enthusiasm.   Industrialization and other social changes were sweeping America, and the concept of social responsibility was gaining momentum. 

The ideal of service had become a “glorious spiritual force” in the U.S., Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover wrote in 1922. The trend was exemplified, according to the future U.S. president, by the “vast multiplication of voluntary organizations for altruistic purposes.”

Lions were at the heart of the service movement. People in small towns and cities across America were ready to respond to the Lions, and to founder Melvin Jones’ maxim that “You can’t get very far until you start doing something for somebody else.”

Lion’s public profile rose as the organization launched a prominent fight against blindness and local Lions clubs took on great causes. Lions in Houston pitched in to raise money for children in war-torn Belgium. Lions in Los Angeles helped fund a playground. Lions in Cincinnati raised money for a war memorial.

Wherever Lions clubs were established, they encouraged members to work to benefit their communities.

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